Federal grants fund rural treatment centers to fight overdoses

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According to the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), $15 million in funding will be made available to rural communities to address psychostimulant abuse and related overdose deaths.

Part of HHS’s overdose prevention strategy, the grants are part of more than $400 million for the Rural Communities Opioid Response Program (RCORP) initiative that aims to reduce deaths and overdoses from substance use disorders of substances in high-risk rural communities.

And the funding, said HRSA administrator Carole Johnson, would go directly to rural communities.

“The Biden administration has made significant investments in substance use disorders, prevention, treatment and recovery,” Thompson said in an interview with The Daily Yonder.

“But what’s different here is that we’re really targeting the rural communities that need the money the most. Sometimes what you see is that when awards are given at the state level or at the regional level, the money doesn’t always reach the rural communities.

According to Health Resource Services Administration (HRSA)drug overdose deaths involving psychostimulants, including methamphetamine and cocaine, as well as prescription drugs to treat ADHD and depression, rose from 547 in 1999 to 23,837 in 2020, an increase of more than 4000%.

Drug overdose deaths have increased dramatically since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, officials said, and the rate of overdose deaths associated with psychostimulants, in general, is higher in rural areas than in areas. urban, said Thompson.

“What we’re seeing more and more are overdose deaths from illicit synthetic opioids, like fentanyl,” she said. “What also concerns us is when stimulants like methamphetamine are mixed with fentanyl. Really, you think about the fact that it’s not a discrete market and there’s a lot of mixing here. We want to make sure communities have the tools they need, and we created this program…because communities told us that’s what they see and feel like they don’t. have so much ability to solve.

HRSA said overdose deaths related to cocaine and psychostimulants disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minority populations such as Black and Native American/Alaska Native populations.

In May, the The White House released a plan to tackle psychostimulants and their impact on public health and safety.

“As we work to stop the devastation caused by fentanyl, we cannot and will not lose sight of the role psychostimulants play in the nation’s substance use crisis,” Johnson said. “Our investment will help rural communities across the country expand access to addiction treatment for psychostimulant abuse and open pathways to recovery.”

The $500,000 grants were awarded to 29 clinics across the country, including St. Luke’s Miners Memorial Hospital in Coaldale, Pennsylvania, and Mariposa Community Health Center in Nogales, Arizona.

Winners can be located in rural or urban areas, but according to HRSA guidelines, applying organizations must “ensure that local control of the award is given to the targeted rural communities.” In addition, all service delivery sites where clinical and social services are provided must be exclusively located in an HRSA designated rural area, as defined by HRSA Rural Health Grant Eligibility Analyzer.

The $15 million investment will be in addition to another $55 million in funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) for its Tribal Opioid Response (TOR) to the overdose crisis in communities. tribal.

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Federal grants will fund rural treatment centers to tackle psychostimulant overdoses

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), $15 million in funding will be made available to rural communities to address psychostimulant abuse and related overdose deaths.

A component of HHS’s overdose prevention strategy, the grants are part of more than $400 million for the Rural Communities Opioid Response Program (RCORP) initiative that aims to reduce deaths and overdoses from addiction-related disorders. substance use in high-risk rural communities.

And the funding, HRSA Administrator Carole Johnson said it will go directly to rural communities.

“The Biden administration has made significant investments in substance use disorders, prevention, treatment and recovery,” Thompson said in an interview with the Daily Yonder.

“But what’s different here is that we’re real primarily targeting rural communities that need the money the most. Sometimes what you see is when rewards are given at the State or regional, the money doesn’t always get to rural communities.”

According to Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA)drug overdose deaths involving psychostimulants, including methamphetamine and cocaine, as well as prescription drugs to treat ADHD and depression, rose from 547 in 1999 to 23,837 in 2020, an increase of more than of 4000%.

Drug overdose deaths have increased dramatically since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, officials said, and the rate of overdose deaths associated with psychostimulants, in general, is higher in rural areas than in areas. urban, said Thompson.

“What we’re seeing more and more are overdose deaths from illicit synthetic opioids, like fentanyl,” she says. “What also concerns us is when stimulants like methamphetamine are mixed with fentanyl. Really, you think about the fact that it’s not a discrete market and there’s a lot of mixing here. We want to make sure communities have the tools they need, and we created this program…because communities told us that’s what they see and feel like they don’t. have so much ability to solve. » p>

HRSA said cocaine and psychostimulants involved in overdose deaths disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minority populations such as Black and Native American/Alaska Native populations.

In May, the The White House released a plan to tackle psychostimulants and their impact on public health and safety.

“As we work to stop the devastation caused by fentanyl, we cannot and will not lose sight of the role psychostimulants play in the nation’s addiction crisis,” Johns said. “Our investment will help rural communities across the country expand access to addiction treatment for psychostimulant abuse and open pathways to recovery.”

The $500,000 grants were awarded to 29 clinics across the country, including St. Luke’s Miners Memorial Hospital, in Coaldale, Pennsylvania, and Mariposa Community Health Center in Nogales, Arizona.

Fellows may be located in rural or urban areas, but according to HRSA guidelines, applying organizations must “ensure that local control as the award is vested in the targeted rural communities. services where clinical and social services are provided must be exclusively located in an HRSA designated rural area, as defined by HRSA Rural Health Grant Eligibility Analyzer.

The $15 million investment will be in addition to another $55 million in funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) for its Tribal Opioid Response (TOR) overdose crisis in tribal communities.

This article first appeared on The Daily Yonder and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

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